Research Protocol Development Specialist - Cancer Center

Research Protocol Development Specialist - Cancer Center

Posted on Jan 22, 2019

Chicago, Illinois - United States
Job Type: EMPLOYEE
Job Type: FULL TIME
Apply By: Feb 09, 2019


The University of Illinois Cancer Center is seeking a Research Protocol Development Specialist. This position contributes to the design and delivery of research grants and clinical protocols for clinical trials and community-based research. Collaborates with researchers, physicians, Cancer Center, Clinical Trials Office, and other departments/organizations to design, develop and write scientifically innovative and sound research protocols, research grants and compliant informed consent forms.

Duties:

  • Plan and write new research protocols, consent forms, research grants, and other ancillary material (i.e., research subject telephone scripts, instructional guides, research manuals) and revise/amend existing documents as necessary.
  • Identify and resolve discrepancies between IRB protocol and research protocol, and interpret and ensure compliance with sponsor, university, and third party regulations and policies. Meet project goals and deadlines.
  • Keep current on legislation, rules, regulations, and polices; educate physicians and staff regarding changes as related to clinical research protocol design, informed consent form requirements, and research grant writing requirements.
  • Contribute material, prepare reports, and assist in the writing of research findings for papers, presentations, and other documents. Write and review investigator-generated scientific journal articles.
  • Perform other related duties and participate in special projects as assigned.

Requirements

Qualifications:

  • Master's degree in science or related field required. Doctoral degree preferred.
  • Minimum of three years related research experience required, including protocol design, informed consent form development, and/or successfully written grants/grant writing. Experience writing protocols for cancer research preferred.